Post-Logout Redirect with ASP.NET Core and ADFS 2016

Redirect after logout

When a user logs out from your app you have the option to log them out of the provider as well by redirecting the browser to the logout endpoint. By default this means that the user will end up sat on your providers “You have signed out” page – not brilliant.

You can, however, tell your provider to redirect back to your app once they’re done with logout by specifying a post_logout_redirect_uri.

For ASP.NET Core Identity you can specify this redirection as a parameter on the SignOutResult.

[Route("auth")]
public class AuthController
{
  [HttpPost("logout")]
  public IActionResult Logout() => new SignOutResult(
    OpenIdConnectDefaults.AuthenticationScheme,
    new AuthenticationProperties { RedirectUri = Url.Action(nameof(LogoutSuccess))});

  [HttpGet("logoutSuccess")]
  public IActionResult LogoutSuccess() => View();
}

Useless ADFS error messages

For ADFS 2016 you need to do a little bit more than just set the redirect URL. On first inspection you can see that the above will set the parameter in the ADFS URL but ADFS will silently ignore it and your user will sit forever on the ADFS sign-out page.

Digging into the event logs you will find the following error message:

The specified redirect URL did not match any of the OAuth client’s redirect URIs. The logout was successful but the client will not be redirected

If you’re unlucky, this wonderfully-misleading error message can take you down a rabbit hole of further configuration. It’s a shame, then, that no-one thought to expose something a little more accurate:

That redirect looks good but you need to specify id_token_hint or we’ll ignore you

Thanks ADFS!

Sending ID Token Hint

To be fair to ADFS, sending an id_token_hint is recommended by the spec. This parameter needs to be set to the id_token that was sent to your app when the user first logged in; provide this value and ADFS will happily redirect back to your app.

The only problem here is that you probably don’t still have that id_token. ASP.NET Core Identity uses the identity information to create an auth cookie and then (by default) discards it.

Happily, the OpenIdConnectOptions exposes a SaveTokens property to persist the received token to the auth cookie. Even better: the OIDC logout mechanism will automatically pick this up once enabled so you should be good to go as soon as you set the flag:

public class Startup {
  public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
  {
    services.AddAuthentication()
      .AddOpenIdConnect(options => {
        options.SaveTokens = true;
        //...set other options
      });

    //...other service config
  }
}

This does have one important downside though: you’re now storing much more information in your auth cookie and that adds extra data to every client request, maybe even doubling the cookie size.

Whether or not this is a problem for your app is another decision – at least your logout redirect works now!

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