Supporting SignalR Client Handlers after Connection Start

(Yes, that is a pretty specific post title but then this is a pretty specific problem…)

In general, when you create a new SignalR connection you are obliged to have already defined any of your handlers on the connection.yourHubName.client object. This allows SignalR to discover those handlers and hook them up to the incoming messages.

Problem: Multiple connection sources

This approach is fine as long as you have a single place from which you are starting your connection but what if you have 2 hubs, 2 separate client handlers…2 of everything?

They will both automatically share a SignalR connection so you can end up with a bit of a race condition where the first handler to start the connection will be the only handler registered.  Imagine the following handlers…

function MyFirstHandler() {
  //assign the handler
  $.connection.myHub1.client.method1= function() { ... };

  //start the connection
  $.connection.myHub1.connection.start();
}

function MySecondHandler() {
  //assign the handler
  $.connection.myHub2.client.method2= function() { ... };

  //start the connection
  $.connection.myHub2.connection.start();
}

//...some time later...
new MyFirstHandler()
//...and even later still...
new MySecondHandler()

By the time we create MySecondHandler we have already created the connection and so method2 is not attached and will never be invoked.

Solution: Proxy implementation

We can work around this by replacing the connection.yourHubName.client object (normally just a POJO) with something that is aware of the available server methods.  The new client then exposes stubs to which SignalR can connect before our MySecondHandler can provide the “real” handler implementations.

//before creating any handlers
$.connection.myHub1.client = new SignalRClient(['method1','otherHandler']);
$.connection.myHub2.client = new SignalRClient(['method2']);

The SignalRClient implementation has 3 requirements for each named handler:

  1. Always return a valid handler function for SignalR to bind, even if the real handler hasn’t been assigned yet
  2. If the real handler has been assigned, invoke that when the handler is invoked (with all args etc.)
  3. Allow client.myHandler = function(){} assignments for compatibility with existing code

The last requirement means that we need to use Object.defineProperty with custom getter and setter implementations.  The getter should always return a stub method; the setter should store the real handler; and the stub method should invoke the real handler (if assigned).

function SignalRClient(methods) {
	this._handlers = {};
	methods.forEach(this.registerHandler.bind(this));
}

SignalRClient.prototype.invokeHandler = function(name) {
	var handler = this._handlers[name];
	if (handler) {
		var handlerArgs = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
		handler.apply(this, handlerArgs);
	}
}

SignalRClient.prototype.registerHandler = function(name) {
	var getter = this.invokeHandler.bind(this, name);
	Object.defineProperty(this, name, {
		enumerable: true,
		get: function() { return getter },
		set: function (value) { this._handlers[name] = value; }.bind(this)
	});
}

Note that our defined properties must also be marked as enumerable so that the SignalR code picks up on them when it attempts to enumerate the client handler methods.

Now – provided we know the available methods up front – we can start the connection whenever we like and assign our handlers later!

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